Legend of Adaptations: How to Adapt Legend of Zelda

One of my favorite video game franchises is the Legend of Zelda. This thirty six year old series has had many games starting from the NES days all the way up to the Switch. This includes handheld games like the Minish Cap and Link’s Awakening to the iconic console games like Ocarina of Time and Breath of the Wild. As well as two Japanese exclusives in the form of two Tingle games. Personally, my favorite is Majora’s Mask with Twilight Princess not too far behind.

Despite it’s popularity, it hasn’t quite reached the same status that Mario and Sonic have had. For better or worse. It did get an animated series in the form of 1989’s Legend of Zelda which loosely followed the events of the first game. Unlike Mario and Sonic, who got several. And when it comes to live action adaptations, Legend of Zelda has not received one. What is has gotten, is a series of manga based on several different games.

That said, of The Legend of Zelda were to get an adaptation, live action or animated, the question becomes: How Does One Go About Adapting Zelda? That’s what I’m here to discuss. I’ll probably turn this into a series, where I discuss how I think it would be best adapted.

Starting with this, I’ll be discussing how I think it should be handled. If it should be a movie, a series, or both. From there, my next post will address how they should go about adapting the games. Starting with Sky

Movies or Shows? Both?

While each game could be their own movie, I do feel like it should be a hybrid of both. The reason I say that is because of how the timeline for the games breaks apart after Ocarina of Time. I feel like it could cause less confusion and viewers could watch each timeline consecutively or simultaneously.

But what is this split timeline, and why does it matter? I hear you asking. To summarize, when the 1998 Nintendo 64 game, Ocarina of Time was released, how it ended caused a sort of ripple effect. While one would think that there would only be one timeline considering Link was sent back in time, as his child self to stop Ganondorf. Thereby canceling out the future timeline he went to. However, it ended up creating three separate timelines. Think of it as multiverses, but in the form of alternate timelines that don’t really interact.

There is the Child Timeline, which covers Majora’s Mask, Twilight Princess, and Four Swords Adventures. This is where the hero success and the future adventures and rebirth of the Hero of Time.

The Adult Timeline, which consists of The Wind Waker, The Phantom Hourglass, and Spirit Tracks, covers the future the Hero of Time left behind. In order to prevent that timeline’s Ganondorf from escaping, Hyrule is flooded. These two timelines are the timelines where the Hero of Time is successful in defeating Ganondorf.

The third timeline addresses the notion of the Hero of Time failing. This timeline consists of A Link to the Past, Link’s Awakening, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages (a.k.a. The Oracle games), A Link Between Worlds, Triforce Heroes, The Legend of Zelda (1986), and Zelda 2: The Adventures of Link.

The only games that do not fit into this timeline are the Hyrule Warrior games, which are spinoffs, and of course, the Smash Bros series, which is a fighting game that crosses over a number of Nintendo’s properties.

As for Breath of the Wild, it’s place in the timeline is meant to be a sort of end of the timeline. Whether or not it’s at the end of one timeline or where all the timelines end, I don’t think it has been confirmed yet.

Why Both?

Circling back to why I think an adaptation of the series should be both movie based and series based is because I feel like it would be a simpler solution. I do feel that due to Ocarina of Time and the branching timelines, it would be better logistically to have a few movies kick it off and have three concurrent series. The series would start off as four movies: Skyward Sword, The Minish Cap, Four Swords, and Ocarina of Time, and branch of into three series to cover the three timelines.

Because Ocarina of Time split the timeline into three, I feel like it would get either really confusing or really odd if the studio that picked up Zelda did every game as a movie. For example, if they did one movie from each timeline every year, it might get confusing for the average movie goer, because each release wouldn’t fit in the same timeline until the Child and Adult timeline movies were done, with the Hero falls timeline running longer. Alternatively, viewers might find that it drags on if after each timeline, they jump into the next, until they’re through.

I think three branching televised series could work better. Since each timeline doesn’t intersect, theoretically, the studio could run three separate shows simultaneously. Each series would dedicate a season to a corresponding game. This would give viewers a chance to check series out if they want and each season would give time for them to develop.

For instance, I do not seeing them condensing Twilight Princess into a two hour movie. And with as many games in the Hero is Defeated timeline, which might not require as much playtime or aren’t necessarily long games, they could work well as maybe thirteen episode seasons.

And before you ask, I will discuss a possibility for Skyward Sword and Ocarina of Time to be two part movies and an alternative if they went the series route for both.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, the Legend of Zelda series is one I think could be adapted under the right circumstances. Whether that be in the form of a series of movies, shows, or a combination of the two, with the right hands, it could be a successful adaptation. But what do you think? Should Legend of Zelda ever be adapted? Do you think it should it be live action or animated? A series of movies or a serialized show?

Sun Sister: A Review

The Sun Sister, released after I had finally caught up on the rest of the series. I was certainly curious to see what they would do with Electra’s character, as she was the one who seemed to have the least screen presence… or book appearances, when compared to the others. She does show up several times throughout the first five books, but it did feel like she was more so referred to than actually having scenes.

Unfortunately, this would be my least favorite in the series. Due to seeing and agreeing with some of the criticisms in reviews, I do feel like it could have been better. There were a lot of good concepts there, and I was all for them, but I did see how the execution seems rushed. It’s not terrible by any means, however, out of all seven books so far, one had to be the least enjoyed. And for me, it was this one.

Series Disclaimer

While this series does involve each character finding their birth family, I do not believe that it was the author’s intent to diminish adopted families. Having read the series, I interpreted it as each daughter being given the choice to find their birth families if they so choose. With each daughter choosing to investigate their history.

Book Specific Disclaimer

Know that Sun Sister does address drug addiction and recovery throughout Electra’s story. How well the story handles it will depend on the reader, but know that it is addressed.

Synopsis

Electra’s story is one of fame, struggles, and living in the moment. Electra, despite being the youngest sister, has had a rather successful career in modeling. However, her personal life is far from perfect. After putting off the information Pa Salt had left her in regards to her family tree, and getting help for her addiction, she decides to look into it. When she is given a letter from a woman claiming to be her grandmother, she finds herself meeting this woman and discovering her family history while coping and working on bettering herself.

Meanwhile, starting in 1939 Cecily Huntley-Morgan finds herself moving from New York to Kenya on a journey of rediscovery and recovery. With war and disaster on the horizon, she finds herself marrying a man named Bill Forsythe and joining him as he works alongside the Maasai Tribe, who he has close connections with. As loneliness starts to set in, Cecily finds a baby that had been abandoned and raises them as her own.

Positives

I will say that I did appreciate the story it was telling. For Electra’s story, I appreciate how she does get help for her struggles. What she was going through is relatable and worth discussing. I also thought Electra had some good, albeit not perfect, development.

I also thought it was neat how this story did decide to address some of the Civil Rights era. It was a step forward time period wise, where as most of the previous books past story segments took place between the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Because while it does start off in the late 1930’s, having a slightly more modern and notable time period was a nice change of pace.

Critiques

Unfortunately, the execution is where it feels lacking. It probably doesn’t help that I did read a few reviews before hand, something I typically try to refrain from unless I am that curious about if a book is worth reading. And while I wouldn’t say that checking out reviews, or getting a second opinion/feedback before going into a book is bad, it did give me something to think about.

Because, while I do think that there were good intentions behind the book, I also think that it wasn’t as well executed as it could have been. Which was something some reviews noted on more or less. So while I can credit it for trying, I can also critique it for it’s execution.

One critique that stuck out to me was how quick the story seemed to skim over Electra’s recovery. And I can kind of see why. It does address it and has some moments dedicated to it, but it does feel like it could have or should have gone more in depth with it. Of course, it goes without saying that I am not an expert when it comes to addiction recovery and how long it should take, despite what knowledge I do have on it. That said, I can see why it might have felt rushed and/or not as developed as it should have been.

Another complaint I’ve seen was with Electra herself. Mostly with characterization. I will admit, Electra was the one sister I was curious about, but also the one I wasn’t sure hot to feel about. I would definitely say the character is a bit rough around the edges and there were areas that might have needed some improvement. However, I don’t think I was as critical to Electra as some people might have been, though I do agree there could have been different ways to handle the character in some instances.

Conclusion

Overall, I would give this book a six out of ten. I do believe that there were areas that could have been improved upon with the character and how certain story elements could have been done differently. That said, I do kind of appreciate what the book was trying to do with it’s handling of Electra’s mental health and addiction, even if the execution wasn’t stellar.

Moon Sister: A Review

The fifth book in the series, The Moon Sister, is one of my favorites alongside Seven Sisters (the first book) and the reason I got into the series. I stumbled upon it while working on returns at the library. Someone had returned the large print copy of the item and the synopsis got me curious. However, when I found out it was book five, I did decide to read the other books first. Even though I didn’t have to since each book is acts as a standalone with very little to do with the previous books. At least until book seven, The Missing Sister, which has all of the six sisters meeting up to fins the “missing sister” that Pa Salt never found. Regardless, I read all the books prior so that I could get familiar with the story.

General Disclaimer

Routine disclaimer for the found family and how it meshes with adopted family concept.

While this series does involve each character finding their birth family, I do not believe that it was the author’s intent to diminish adopted families. Having read the series, I interpreted it as each daughter being given the choice to find their birth families if they so choose. With each daughter choosing to investigate their history.

Disclaimer: The Romani and a Terms Deemed Offensive to Them

I wanted to take a moment to discuss this a little bit. First of, I did like how it explored a Romani angle with Tiggy and her family was interesting, and based on a Q&A, https://lucindariley.co.uk/seven-sisters-series/the-moon-sister/q-a-the-moon-sister/ Lucinda Riley did have an interest in learning about the culture and beliefs.

That said, I feel like a certain topic should be addressed. Several times in the book and in the Q&A, she does use the word G*psy. For those of you who might not know, it is a term that is considered offensive to the Romani people. The average person might not know this, but it is something I have come to learn about over the years and have refrained from using out of respect.

Since I cannot confirm intent, I will give her the benefit of the doubt and say she wasn’t trying to be malicious. Ill informed, perhaps, but not malicious. And with her passing in June of 2021, there may be no way to get a concrete answer. As such, I do not wish to make an assumption on intent and knowledge about the term. I am not excusing any offensive terms being used, but I do know that it is possible that she could have been misinformed and not malicious. However, if it comes to light that she was being malicious with it (via rough drafts, journals, etc.) I would definitely reconsider my approach to this book and would not recommend it.

Synopsis

After Pa Salt’s passing, Taygete “Tiggy” D’Aplièse returns to her work on a wildlife preservation in Scotland. She does decide to investigate her family history and finds herself developing feelings for Charlie, the doctor that she has been staying with, despite knowing his relationship with his wife, soon to be ex-wife. When her health takes an unexpected turn, she finds herself needing medical treatment that brings her to Granada Spain, where her family had lived.

Meanwhile, in 1912, readers are introduced to Lucia Amaya Albaycin, a n up and coming flamingo dancer in Granada Spain. She is passionate about her skill and has the chance to expand it and travel. However, as war breaks out and her career growing, Lucia finds herself having to choose between her dancing, the man she loves, and her family.

Positives

This is one book where I enjoyed both the present and the past parts. Much like the previous two books, I found myself relating to areas of the story and characters, namely Tiggy, who is an animal lover, as am I. And while she was drawn to Scotland, I find myself drawn to learning more about Ireland. I also liked how she grew. Tiggy is also one of my favorite sisters, maybe even my favorite. I liked her kind hearted and calm nature.

As for Lucia’s portions, I did like the direction they went with it. While it did have elements that were similar with the previous past stories in pervious books, I liked to approach. I enjoyed how it had Lucia following her dreams and the slow burn that was to come. I didn’t want the character to fail, but it was interesting to see how her passion and her

The Grey Area

Though I am curious about the Romani people, I will admit my information about them and their culture is limited. So I cannot say how accurately they were portrayed, I do think Lucinda Riley did a good job in some areas. They weren’t shown to be malicious like some media may portray them, but people living their own lives and wanting to better themselves and their people. And again, while I know certain terms used for them are considered derogatory, I cannot confirm if Lucina Riley was being malicious when using it.

Critiques

One critique I did have was with the whole thing with Charlie’s ex-wife and the whole cheating concept to Tiggy and Charlie’s relationship. While Tiggy did try to suppress her feeling for Charlie given the circumstances, but it wasn’t quite executed the best.

I also don’t really care for Zad, Maia’s questionable ex, returning in this book. I don’t think he was really necessary to have in the story. FOr whatever reason, he pops up several times throughout the series trying to get with one of the D’Aplièse sisters. He was in a relationship with Maia, tried to get with Tiggy, and was with Electra for a brief time between the two.

Conclusion

I would rate this book an eight out of teen. Overall, I thought it was an enjoyable read. The story in Granada, Spain was nice and I did like aspects of Tiggy’s story as well. However, elements of Tiggy and Dr. Charlie’s relationship, Zed, and the use of a term deemed offensive to Romani people (malicious or not), do bring this story down.

My Hopes/Expectations For Netflix’s Sandman Adaptation

What if I told you I only recently got into Neil Gaiman’s Sandman series? Much like Watchmen, Sandman was a series I always know about, but never got into it when I was younger. It wasn’t until I finally started getting into graphic novels/comics and after I was given a recommendation that I checked out both. Watchmen has become one of my favorite comics and I am steadily making my way through Sandman (I’m currently two volumes in and own the first six with plans to get the entire series) and I am enjoying it.

With Netflix’s adaptation coming up fast, I thought I would take a moment to discuss a couple of hopes/expectations I have going into the series. Three to be exact. I plan to watch the series when it’s released, since I am interested in it and it’s one show I am excited to watch. Whether I watch a few episodes a day or binge the entire season in one, we’ll see.

Following the Comic as Closely as Possible, While Still Adding Its Own Flair

When it comes to adaptations, creative liberties are expected and usually fine. Sometimes things get cut or added for the sake of adaptation. And sometimes somethings are tweaked.

For example, Peter Jackson removing the scenes Tom Bombadil when making the Lord of the Rings trilogy. While a case could be made that he should have been left in the movie, since he was where the Hobbits got Bill the horse, I don’t think cutting Tom Bombadil was a bad call. Especially since he didn’t really return after his appearance in Fellowship of the Ring.

Back to Sandman, I do think it should follow along with the comic. Not to a tee perhaps, but still following along as close as possible. It would appear that the first season will follow the first two volumes (Preludes & Nocturnes and The Doll House) and is planned to be a faithful adaptation with a few tweaks (ex. the series taking place in 2021 as opposed to 1989 and Morpheus/Dream being imprisoned for 105 years as opposed to 75). And with Neil Gaiman having a hand in this series, I’m sure he will approve of the direction this series takes.

All and all, I am hopeful that this will be a pretty faithful adaptation with tweaks and creative liberties taken as needed.

Good Special Effects When Needed.

Special effects and CGI are things that can be either really good or really bad depending on the execution. For instance, The Mummy Returns is known for its dated CGI, specifically when it came to the Scorpion King, while Lord of the Rings, which used practical and special effects, would be considered a good use of special effects and CGI.

While I may not be trained in using CGI and the like, as a viewer, I do know how bad effects can ruin or diminish the quality of a property. Put it simply, I would hope for good special effects as well as it not being overly used. I know that the series would need special effects given the nature of the series, but that doesn’t mean it needs to rely too heavily on it. So long as it’s presentable and not too heavily relied on, I think that will be okay.

A Good Time Viewing

As odd as it might sound, so long as it’s a fun/enjoyable time. Granted, the series does tackle some grim/dark topics, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be enjoyed. So long as it is done well and in a way that can be enjoyed, that’s all I can ask for.

I know some of it’s topics won’t be for everyone, which is okay. I wouldn’t expect it to be. I would just hope it tackles everything in a good and tactful way.

And even if it is dark, I think that’s something that should be explored. Not every show will have themes and stories that are positive. That’s not to say that there shouldn’t be good or positive moments (I do feel like Death will have a few of these), just that it shouldn’t be afraid to tackle some of the darker themes and stories from the comics.

And even though I think this can, and likely will, take a darker tone thematically, that doesn’t mean it won’t have positive or good moments. Shows can mix positive and negative traits. Some shows just might lean on some more than others, with sprinkled in aspects of the other, while other shows balance the two. So long as it is well written, it can be enjoyable.

Conclusion

I know open the floor up to you. Are you excited for The Sandman? Are there any expectations you have for the show? Is there a character, or characters, you can’t wait to see brought to life? Are there any series you’d like to see get adaptation into a televised/animated series?

Sources

Bravely by Maggie Stiefvater: A Review

Off all the Official Disney Princesses, Merida is the one I flip flop the most about in terms of how much I enjoy the character. Usually, I can say that I’ll either be neutral about some (ex. Snow White, and Cinderella), I have some I dislike (ex. Aurora), and a number that I enjoy (ex. Mulan, Jasmine, Ariel, Rapunzel, Belle, and Tiana). However, with Merida, she’ll hit one of those three depending on the day.

I like Brave as a movie and it was nice to see a princess in a similar vein to Mulan in terms of skills and marriage not being an essential part of their story. (Side note: Yes, Mulan 2 exists, but the first Mulan movie didn’t have a romantic subplot for her and I didn’t think a second movie was needed. However, we did get a sequel that was flawed, but confirmed the ambiguity of Shang and Mulan’s relationship at the end of the first). Brave also had some really good music. I also found her appearance in the series Once Upon a Time neat, if underused/underdeveloped. What I disliked was elements of the character and the conflict between her and her mother. On the one hand, I get why she would be frustrated, but on the other, it feels off and/or whiney at times in execution. And while I do like the idea of a mother and daughter learning to understand and respect their differences, it was kind of Merida’s fault that her mom turned into a bear. Not intentionally, and I can see how this can be a critique for some. That said, I can excuse it to a degree since it isn’t a bad concept on paper. It’s just the execution that I guess that I have issue with.

That said, most days I am just neutral about the character, though if you asked, I’m not sure where I would put her when ranking the Official Disney Princesses. If you like her, that’s cool, if not, that is also fine.

Anyways, much like a handful of other books I’ve been drawn to, Braverly by Maggie Stiefvater was one I found through my local library. The cover was eye catching and the blurb was what made me want to give it a try. I’ll admit, while I have seen Maggie Stiefvater’s book in passing, I wouldn’t say that they caught my attention. I think with this being an expansion on Brave, which I thought was neat, and the fact I enjoying the Twisted Tales series was a factor in what drew me to this.

As always: Mild Spoilers Ahead. I do try to avoid spoiling as much as possible, but this is a warning for any plot point that may come up in the review.

Synopsis

When an unexpected being of chaos enters the DunBroch home, Merida is given a year to make a change or else her kingdom and family will fall. With the help from the Cailleach, her family, and her friend Lessie, Merida must voyage to the other Kingdoms to make a change, as well as working with her family for this change. It’s a race against time and it’s up to Merida to find a way to protect her loved ones and stop the oncoming destruction.

Positives

The concept itself was a really neat one and I liked how it continued on after Brave. It gave Merida and her family some development that the movie didn’t get to touch on. It was also interesting to see how the triplets have grown since Brave and have developed differing personalities. Each one, though still having some similar appearances on account of being triplets, has their own individuality.

I also enjoyed how this story explored and expanded on the Celtic folklore aspect of Brave through the Cailleach and Feradach. The will-o-wisps from Brave are a part of Scottish folklore (variations of them may appear in Irish folklore as well). Cailleach is a figure who appears in Gaelic/Celtic (ie. Irish, Scottish, etc.) lore who appears as an old lady or hag and is considered and ancestral figure who is associated with weather and winter. While Feradach plays a role of a deity of chaos. I think these add to the world as well as expand on some of Scotland’s lore.

The story itself, if a little basic, is good. It feels like a natural follow up to Brave.

Critiques

Though the characters have kept their evolution from Brave, I do feel like some of the characters could have used a little more development. Some characters felt a little bit more developed than others. And sometimes, it felt like scenes and interactions treaded on a similar issue form the movie.

Out of all the characters, Lessie is the one I feel could have used a bit more development. I would have liked to get a little more background and development on her. She, much like Cailleach and Feradach, was a character introduced in this book and wasn’t in Brave. But unlike the other two characters, I do feel like she could have gotten a little more development. For instance, her marriage. We are given very little about her marriage and husband to be. Readers know she planned to get married, but ultimately called it off. From there, she’s helping out as much as possible with Merida and her quest.

I wasn’t really that thrilled with some of the banter between Merida and her mother. Specifically in one scene that kind of references the movie.

Conclusion

Over all I would give this book an eight out of ten. I loved the atmosphere and incorporation of Scottish lore and it was a nice way to continue Merida’s story after Brave. I do feel that certain scenes were a bit different and some characters got more development, however. If you are looking for a continuation of Brave or want a neat YA fantasy read, I would recommend it.

Pearl Sister: A Review

Book four of the Seven Sisters series, Pearl Sister, is the next book for me to review. Similar to the third book, Shadow Sister, this is the second of two books that I feel neutral about. However, I think I enjoyed this one a smidge more.

This is also the first book that explores a main character who falls into the LGBTQ+ community. In this book, it starts off as CeCe questioning her sexuality and is later confirmed that she and a secondary character are romantically involved.

Disclaimer

As per usual, I enter this disclaimer in the event you may not have read my previous reviews for the series.

While this series does involve each character finding their birth family, I do not believe that it was the author’s intent to diminish adopted families. Having read the series, I interpreted it as each daughter being given the choice to find their birth families if they so choose. With each daughter choosing to investigate their history

Update from Original Review and Secondary Disclaimer

When I posted my original review for this book, I did not realize that a term to describe the native groups in Australia was considered a bit problematic. I will apologize for not knowing at the time and have fixed the mistake here. This is the same review as it was written, but with proper changes when referring to Australia’s native individuals.

I apologize for the error I made and will be more mindful in the future.

Synopsis

Pearl Sister focuses on the fourth daughter of the D’Aplièse family, Celaeno, or CeCe as she goes by in the book. Starting off during Shadow Sisters to explain why she left Star in England, CeCe decides to look into her family. While she has felt like she doesn’t quite fit in in the family, with Star being the sister she was closest to, readers get to see her come out of her shell. As she travels to Sydney, Australia to follow the clues Pa Salt left her, she finds herself in Thailand where see meets some backpackers, including a young man named Ace, and with some help from him and others along the way, she is able to find out more about her family and herself.

A hundred years earlier, we get to see the story of Kitty McBride, the woman that CeCe is given the task of looking into. Kitty is the daughter of a clergyman, who finds her fate intertwined with the twin sons of a wealthy family that works with pearls. While there, she also finds herself intertwined with some of the Australian native individuals.

As CeCe discovers more about her family history, she rediscovers her creative passions and begins to discover more about herself and who she loves.

Positives

What I really enjoyed about this book was the setting and CeCe’s journey. Because I didn’t particularly like where her story ended in Shadow Sister, it was nice to see some of what was going on with CeCe during that time at the beginning of this story. And seeing her come into her own person, it was nice to see how that unfolded.

It was also nice to see how this book broke the formula a little bit. Star did a little bit too with how it approached Mouse and Orlando and who Star ended up getting with, but I liked what they did with CeCe’s a bit more. Since CeCe’s story is one of self-discovery, seeing her questioning her sexuality and her feelings for Chrissie come to light. The two get along really well, both as friends and as partners, and it was nice how Chrissie to help explain the native culture and history to CeCe.

I also enjoyed the parts in Australia alongside some of it’s history. Elements of Kitty’s story was interesting too. How her story intertwines with CeCe is different, but in a good way.

CeCe is also one of two or three sisters I kind of relate to. Tiggy being another, which I’ll get into in my review for Moon Sister, and Star possibly being the third (the only reason I’m hesitant to say I relate to Star is because I more so enjoyed the book/writing aesthetic of Shadow Sister’s setting and side characters as someone who is an avid book lover and writer). I relate to CeCe’s desire for self-discovery and creativity as a writer and occasional artist myself.

Critiques

I suppose my biggest critique with Pearl Sister is Kitty’s story. While the formula for the historical parts isn’t bad, I just didn’t find Kitty’s part as interesting. While I did enjoy aspects of it, like the mother that Kitty ends up helping and the approach to conflicts at the time, the romance subplot in it, wasn’t that compelling. I do think the use of the twins was a neat touch, I just didn’t like the execution.

The part in Thailand, though having a point, wasn’t all that memorable after reading. While certain details there were necessary, some readers do feel like it stayed around a bit too long. I can kind of agree, as I would have liked to get to Australia. However, I can see what areas of it were necessary. Mainly some character developing and investigating for CeCe’s journey.

I will also include the term used to describe Australia’s native individuals. I cannot confirm or deny any malice on Lucinda Riley’s part (much like with terms used in the next book), so I will not pass judgement until I know for sure. I won’t condone it either. I merely cannot speak for Lucinda Riley with her passing last year and the fact I found out out how problematic it was until recently.

Conclusion

I enjoyed how this story broke the mold in some areas and enjoyed CeCe’s growth. However, some duller elements and terminology did effect my enjoyment of the book. I would give this book a six and a half out of ten depending on the day since despite my neutral feelings towards it, I do enjoy it more than Shadow Sister.

Reviews, Recommendations, and Discussions

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