Tag Archives: Historical Fiction

September in Review: What I Read

The month of September has been a slower month for me. Having lowered my reading goal from one hundred and fifty-six to one hundred and fifty, it gave me time to breathe and not feel like I was falling far behind. That said, I am making progress and am on track.

For the month of September, I have read four books, four comics, and one manga. Totaling out to nine books this month. These are those books and my general thoughts on them.

Epic Tales: Celtic Myths and Tales/Celtic Myths and Tales: Epic Tales by Various

This collection of Celtic tales has been sitting in my Currently Reading shelf since March. It was originally going to be the “bigger/more in depth book” that I would read in March as well as fitting into the Ireland theme I had planned for the month (Note: I will sometimes dedicate a month for a specific topic, theme, or what have you for a particular month. For instance June, I read mostly LGBTQ+ centered books in honor of Pride Month. It’s a way for me to expand my reading and maybe find a book I like that I might not have thought of previously). The only reason it took me this long was because of other books I had to read, the fact I wanted to take my time with this book, and my motivation to read it being hit or miss.

So for the month of September, I decided to sit my butt down and finish it. Overall, I would say that I enjoyed it. All of the tales were really neat and were divided into sections. It’s also a really nice collection of tales, and a number of which, if any, might not appear in the Irish Fairy and Folk Tales leather bound book I own. This book is also apart of a series of “epic tales” which include other tales from other mythologies, Mary Shelley, Black Sci-Fi stories, and more. A number of these are included on my to read list, including the Black Sci-Fi stories, Epic Tales: Norse Myths and tales, Epic Tales: Persian Myths and Tales, African Myths and Tales, and Epic Tales: Japanese Myths and Tales.

Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Essential X-Men Volume 11 by Chris CLaremont

I’ve been making my way through the Classic X-Men comics via the Epic Collection and their respected Omnibuses. This is the last of the Essential X-Men Collection that I needed to read before hopping into the run starting in the 90’s (Either through regular paper backs or their respected Epic Collection). I’ve been enjoying this run of the X-Men, some issues and volumes a little more, but this has been a fun run. This one was one that I enjoyed, but maybe not as much as others. However, I do think it was still worth a read.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

Death: At Death’s Door by Jill Thompson

The Sandman has been on my to read list since at least the beginning of 2022. I managed to get through the first two volumes before the release of the Netflix adaptation and read the Deluxe Edition of Death last month. I also ended up reading the two Little Endless Storybooks (The Little Endless Storybook and Delirium’s Party). I checked this out on a whim as well as for a quick read since I was a little behind on my reading total.

I’m kind of mixed on the story as a whole, however, it was a fun read. The art and the story did remind me of some early 2000’s manga tie ins like Kingdom Hearts 1, 2, and Chain of Memories, which were all fun and whimsical reads. If you are looking for a fun and slightly different story within the Sandman universe, I would give it a shot.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 Stars.

Unmasking Autism: Discovering the New Faces of Neurodiversity by Devon Price, PhD

One topic I have an on and off interest with are nonfiction books on Autism. As someone who has been diagnosed with Autism (Asperger’s when it was used a little more frequently), I’ve had an interest in reading upon it over the last few years. Mostly because, like a number of people who fall on the spectrum, I had a hard time coming to terms with it due to some perceptions out there and feeling disheartened by it. These days, I am more comfortable with it, but I want to better understand Autism where I previously didn’t.

Reading Unmasking Autism has helped me. In fact, it is set up in a way that I connect with. A lot of what this book covers touches on things that I had felt when I was younger, the conflicting emotions and having to mask that side of myself in order to appear normal. This is probably the first book on Autism that resonated with me on a personal level. And for that, I appreciate it and am glad that I bought it.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 Stars

Ziggy, Stardust, and Me by James Brandon

This one I picked up on a whim on one of my Barnes and Noble trips. It was one I was considering, but I wasn’t sure if I was going to get the hardcover or wait until the paperback was released the following Tuesday (Sundays are my Barnes and Noble days since it’s a day I don’t work on and is the one day out of the weekend that right for me). Towards the end of this trip, I was looking at the LGBTQ+ section in the YA area, looking for Loveless by Alice Oseman, when I spotted it. And as luck would have it, there was one copy of the paperback copy available before it was even supposed to hit shelves (Goodreads said the paperback was set to release that Tuesday, September 13th). Which coincidentally, was the second time that has happened to me, with the first being the Essential Legends Collection release of Darth Maul: Shadow Hunter, which I got my hands on the Sunday before it’s release date that Tuesday (August 2nd). And had this been on my radar in June, I might have read it along with the other LGBTQ+ books I read that month (I do wish I read one or two more fiction books that month honestly, but I digress).

Taking place in the 1970’s and right around the time the events at Waterloo broke, it focuses on a young man trying to find his place in the world, when he meets Web, a Lakota teen, who in some ways is his total opposite. This is a coming of age story that deals with how people perceived the LGBTQ+ at the time and two young men whose lives are changed forever. Note: This book does cover some sensitive topics like racism towards Native Americans and how being gay was seen as a mental disorder.

Rating: 4.4 out of 5 Stars

Wolverine Vol 2 (1980’s) Issues 45-47 by Larry Hama

These are here since I needed to read them before hoping into Essential Wolverine Vol 3. On Goodreads, I counted these issues towards the Essential Wolverine Vol 2 since, due to me not being able to get my hands on volume 2 through my library. Plus, I would rather have these issues act as one entry, so lumping it in with Essential Wolverine volume 2, I felt made sense since technically, I already read most of it with the second and third Epic Collection volumes. Which I noted when I finished.

Overall, I though these were solid enough issues. Not sure if I would go back to them, but it was neat to see Logan and Jubilee teaming up.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

X-Men Red (2018) Vol. 1 by Tom Taylor

I wanted to read this series before I inevitably get into the 2022 X-Men run. From my understanding this, X-Men Gold, and X-Men Blue, were a sort of trio run with each one focusing on the Scott/Jean/Logan trinity. Scott is Blue, Jean is Red, and Logan is Gold. I read Gold, which had Nightcrawler as a mainstay and was a reason why I picked it up. And I enjoyed it. I don’t know if I will jump on Blue, at least at this time, but I may eventually.

As for the first volume of 2019’s X-Men Red, it was alright. The story itself made sense with the direction they wanted with Jean (focusing on her being a sort of spokesperson for the X-Men, the brief discussion on the Phoenix Force, and Jean seeking out alliances with Namor and T’Challa). I just wasn’t as invested/interested in this one compared to X-Men Gold. I’ll still read the second volume though. It was just kind of average for me personally.

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Almost There by Farrah Rochon

Disney’s Twisted Tales are some really neat books. Acting as what if for the movies there based on, they generally have one question in mind. What if a different choice or event happened in the story? For instance, in Go the Distance, it asks, “What if Meg Had to Become a God?”

This one focuses on Tiana and Princess and the Frog. And personally, this is one of my favorites. Reflection is my favorite thus far, but Almost There is right up there with it. It was a good spin on the Princess and the Frog and it was interesting to see what direction it took. my only critiques, which I go over in my review, were one or two little things, but other than that, I thought this was a good read.

Rating: 4.25 out of 5

Trial of Magneto by Leah Williams

I finished off September with Trials of Magneto. I was looking for a quick read and I kind of wanted to check this one out. Mostly because of the mixed reception and it no longer being a comic on my to buy list. So I checked it out through my library and gave it a read.

Now, I don’t now if it’s because I am slowly inching my way into the Krakoa Age, or if this is something others believe too, but this story kind of felt all over the place. One minute it’s about Magneto going on trial for possible killing Wanda, the next she’s not dead and interacting with her past, present, and future selves. And there is some kind of resolution at the end.

That said, I wouldn’t say it’s terrible enough for one star. And if I can give it anything positive, it would be that the art was nice and that there was potential for a good/interesting story. Other than that though, I just didn’t enjoy it.

Rating: 2 out of 5 Stars

Conclusion

Nine books for the month of September. Some good. Some bad. Some average. What were some books you read in September? Thoughts?

Almost There by Farrah Rochon: A Review

The thirteenth book in the Disney Twisted Tales series, Almost There asks the question: What if Tiana Made a Deal that Changed Everything? A question that this novel looks to answer.

When I first heard that this book was coming out, I was intrigued. Though 2009’s Princess and the Frog didn’t catch my interest when it was initially released, it is one that I have revisited and really enjoy. The art and music were really good and the direction it took the story was interesting. This is also the movie that introduced us to Tiana, Disney’s first black princess. All and all, I would say that The Princess and the Frog was a solid movie and deserves the appreciation and enjoyment it has received in the years since its release.

Almost There is the thirteenth book in the Twisted Tales line and was the one I had the most curiosity for after the last two books. Go the Distance was a nice one and What Once Was Mine wasn’t exactly what I was hoping for when I read it (loved the concept, wasn’t fond of certain decisions). And while I had an inkling for what they might have gone with in terms of twisting the story (Tiana taking the deal), how it was executed was neat.

And having just recently finished the book, I thought it was time to review it. Note: I will try to avoid as many spoilers as possible, but as always, Possible Spoilers Ahead.

Synopsis

The story begins with a few scenes from Tiana’s past. A lot of it being about her father and establishing moments from the movie and built off of it. Readers then jump to the present where Tiana makes a deal with Dr. Facilier that will give her her father back in exchange for an elixir his friends from the other side want her to use.

When she agrees, with one little detail missed, she gets what she had always wanted. Her friends safety, her own restaurant and her father. However, when eerie things begin to change. And when Dr. Facilier comes back a year later to collect and follow upon that missed detail, Tiana finds herself thrown into a world of trouble, and it’s up to her, Charlotte, and Naveen to reverse what the Shadow Man created.

Positives

What I thought was really good about this book had to do with the story, some of the characters, and the setting. It was also interesting to see how it worked off of the established connection Tiana had with her father and their love for cooking. It was also really nice to see these two bonding and how it eventually dealt with Tiana’s love for her father and the grief that comes along with it.

For the story, the direction they went with made sense. I did speculate that Tiana would take the offer Dr. Facilier gave her, but where such an offer would go, I wasn’t sure. That said, it does feel like a logical direction for it to go the way it did, and I think it was executed well for the most part.

As for characters, I did enjoy how this story developed Charlotte a bit more. While Charlotte would be a sort of iconic character in the movie, she only had so many scenes. Here, readers get to see more of her and Tiana’s friendship and Charlotte having some development. Naveen also got a little development too. Like him reflecting on possibly going back to Maldonia after receiving an invitation back, and what that would mean for him. Of course, Tiana got quite a bit of development as the protagonist, which includes how she handles Facilier and the restaurant. As well as how she approaches Naveen now that everyone is back to “normal”.

The setting of the story is also pretty neat too. It still takes place in 1920’s New Orleans which is nice. And while holding onto the music, food, and character the movie had while set in this time period, it does have a moment where it seems to address (if only in an implication sense) about the climate at the time in regards to race. While the movie has that scene with Tiana and the investors at Charlotte’s party with how they present her not getting the building she had her sights set on, Almost There has a scene involving Charlotte and Tiana at a clothing store where one of the workers states Tiana isn’t allowed to shop there (Charlotte does try to defend Tiana in this situation to her best ability while Tiana doesn’t want to start a conflict because of it).

Negatives

As for negatives, while I wouldn’t want to say it feels like it is formulaic, but I suppose the ending could have been a little different. On the one hand, I did like how it was a sort of psyche out. On the other, I kind of saw something a little different (like Facilier “running out of time”). But that’s just me.

One other thing I think they could have done was more scenes with Mama Odie. They do go to see her, but I feel like there could have been more scenes with her. Especially since there was a whole scene with Charlotte being perplexed that everyone but her knew who Mama Odie was. I just felt they could have done more with it.

Conclusion

I would probably give this book a 4.25 out of 5 stars. It’s certainly one of my favorite of the Twisted Tales series and I love how it approached the story. From the characters to how it addressed the plot and setting. I only wish they had done one or two things differently.

The next book in the series is one I heard might be a possibility. That being a Pinocchio set book. The title is When You Wish Upon a Star and is written by Elizabeth Lim, who previously wrote the Mulan Twisted Tale Reflection. When You Wish Upon a Star will focus on the Blue Fairy and asks: What if the Blue Fairy wasn’t Supposed to Help Pinocchio? and is expected to be released on April 4th 2023.

Planned Reading for October.

With October right around the corner, I thought I would give you a sneak peak into what I plan to read for the month. I don’t know if I will review every book I read, though I may do a post on October in review, but I do have a few books that I would like to get done for October.

My currently reading goal for the year is one hundred and fifty books this month. It may bounce back to one hundred and fifty six if I am on track, or above, since I am a fast reader in general (however, I do try to take some books slower).

The goal this month will be for twelve books since I would have to read twelve and a half books a month to keep up with my goal. If possible thirteen. This will include books and graphic novels, the later of which I find quick reads that help me catch up if needed.

The Final Strife by Saara El-Arifi

I actually started reading this book in September, but since I want to take my time with this book, which is six hundred plus pages long, I didn’t want to rush through it. Because, while I am a fast reader, there are instances where I want to take my time with books. This book being one of them.

It’s synopsis on Goodreads reads as followed:

Red is the blood of the elite, of magic, of control.
Blue is the blood of the poor, of workers, of the resistance.
Clear is the blood of the slaves, of the crushed, of the invisible.

Sylah dreams of days growing up in the resistance, being told she would spark a revolution that would free the empire from the red-blooded ruling classes’ tyranny. That spark was extinguished the day she watched her family murdered before her eyes.

Anoor has been told she’s nothing, no one, a disappointment, by the only person who matters: her mother, the most powerful ruler in the empire. But when Sylah and Anoor meet, a fire burns between them that could consume the kingdom—and their hearts.

Hassa moves through the world unseen by upper classes, so she knows what it means to be invisible. But invisibility has its uses: It can hide the most dangerous of secrets, secrets that can reignite a revolution. And when she joins forces with Sylah and Anoor, together these grains of sand will become a storm.

As the empire begins a set of trials of combat and skill designed to find its new leaders, the stage is set for blood to flow, power to shift, and cities to burn.”

This sounds like an interesting read and takes some inspiration from African and Middle Eastern lore. Which I feel might not get as much spotlight when compared to Greek and Norse mythology. I’m already about fifty or so pages in, and am enjoying it so far.

The Dawn of Yangchen by F.C. Yee

I was going to read this around the time it came out. However, motivation and the other books I had read that month got in the way. I enjoyed the Kyoshi duology by the same author, and was curious to see what they are going to do with Avatar Yangchen, the airbending Avatar before Aang.

This novel will be highlighting Yangchen’s time as the Avatar. She also finds it difficult to trust her predecessor, Avatar Szeto, due to the turbulent state of how trust and loyalty are earned in the era she is living in. When she gets pulled into the politics and corruption of the Earth Kingdom city of Bin-Er, she finds herself working alongside and befriending an informant named Kavik. Along the way, Yangchen will have to learn how to trust herself and the wisdom she has, as she embraces what it means to be the Avatar.

I’m not sure if this book will get a second one like the Avatar Kyoshi, though on Goodreads it does have it listed under the author’s Chronicles of the Avatar series tab and an Avatar Yangchen Novels tab. So it might get a second book, or maybe the Avatar Yangchen Novels tab is there to separate it from the Avatar Kyoshi novels. It might be too early to tell.

Wild and Wicked Things by Francesca May

In an attempt to expand my fantasy reads, this book has caught my eye. It’s a story taking place in the 1920’s where magic is rumored to exist on Crow Island.

Annie Mason doesn’t care for magic, real or faux. That is until she meets her neighbor, Emmeline Delacroix, a rumored witch, and witnesses a confrontation between Emmeline and Bea.

This sounded like an interesting read with the 1920’s as a backdrop. It’s also looks like it will deal with LGBTQ+ relationships.

The Monsters We Defy by Leslye Penelope (L. Penelope)

Another 1920’s set fantasy novel, The Monsters We Defy, was another novel that entered my radar while looking for fantasy books. In 1925 Washington DC, Clara Johnson is a young African American woman who can communicate with spirits. A skill she had developed when she was in jail during the darkest moment of her life. Given the opportunity to be free from her debt, Clara is tasked with obtaining a magical ring from the richest woman in the district. Joined by a ragtag team including a hypnotic jazz musician and and aging vaudeville actor who can change his face, it’s up to them to find this ring while also dealing with conflicts that are seeping from the spirit world into the human world.

Where the previous book will appear to focus on LGBTQ+ characters, this book will focus on a diverse group with a black leading lady.

Deadpool Samurai Volumes 1 and 2 by Sanshiro Kasama

Lumping these two together since they are two parts of a series. This was a series I went back and forth on until I ultimately decided to purchase it. And while maybe not what I had in mind when looking for a new manga to try, it sounded fun. Essentially, this manga series seems to drop Deadpool in Japan where he builds a team called the Samurai Squad. And while it seems that the Merc with a Mouth will be doing what he does best, he will be going up against characters like Loki and Thanos.

These will be quick reads that I can have done in a day or two (I know I can get through books pretty easily, but manga are the books I get through the quickest).

Rebel Rose by Emma Theriault and Feather and Fire by Livia Blackburne

Lumping these to together since, much like Deadpool Samurai, these two books are part of a series. But unlike DP Samurai, these are part of a young adult series called the Queens Council. This series seems to be set up in a way similar to the Twisted Tales series, where each book is about a particular Disney movie/story. But instead of it being a twist on the movie it’s based on, each book blends the movies they’re based on with historical events of the time and original stories they were inspired by. With each picking up after their “happily ever after”.

Rebel Rose is based on Beauty and the Beast and focuses on Belle after breaking the curse. Set in 1789 France, Belle is trying to grapple with becoming royalty and her life as a commoner. The revolution is looming over her provenience, and when she finds a magic mirror with a dire warning, it is up to Belle to protect everyone she loves and become the queen she was born to be. Feathers and Fire focuses on Mulan. After saving her country, she is brought to the emperor, who decrees that she will be his heir. As she prepares for this new challenge, she finds that not everyone is thrilled with her new stature, and trust is called into question as treachery creeps it’s ugly head. It’s up to Mulan to use the strength and wisdom of those before her to protect her kingdom.

When I saw Feathers and Fire I knew I was going to check it out. Especially since Mulan is one of my favorite princesses. Beauty and the Beast is also one of my favorite Disney movies, and since Rebel Rose is the first book, I felt it will be worth a read. Even if they don’t need to be read in order and can be read as standalones. There is a third book that will be focusing on Jasmine, though I am uncertain as to when it will be released.

Empire of the Vampire by Jay Kristoff

If I get the chance, I will try to have this book done in October. Much like The Final Strife, this is a bit of a doozy page wise. Totaling at seven hundred and thirty-nine pages, Empire of the Vampire tells the story of a nearly three decade long darkness where vampires rule. Gabriel de León is the last silversaint, someone tasked with defending the realm and church from vampires. And when the Silver Order falls, he is imprisoned by the very creatures he was tasked with defeating. This is his story.

I do not know if I will finish this book before the end of October, but I will try. If I start it early enough I might. But if I don’t, it could be finished in November.

Essential Wolverine Vol 3

Similar to the Classic X-Men runs, I have been reading quite a bit of Wolverine’s comics. I’m slowly but surly making my way through the Essential Collection, I just need to read issues 45-47 before I can jump into this one. That’s mostly due to the fact that I am checking out the Essentials through my library and the second volume wasn’t available, so I had to use the second and third Epic Collection volumes that correlated with this Essential volume. Unfortunately, those two Epic volumes only included issues 17-44, but I do have Marvel Unlimited, so I can use that for the three issues I need.

This will be one of my comics for the month. And the one I will be taking a bit more time with (I tend to take a little time with epic collections and omnibuses). It covers issues 48-69.

Sabretooth (2022): The Adversary

This five issue limited run will be released in a singular volume on October 4th. I already have it preordered, so it’s a matter of waiting. I didn’t know that it was even a thing until I was working on a Wolverine centered TikTok that I found out. That said, I’m intrigued. Though I would consider Magneto as my favorite X-Men antagonist (if he even counts as one currently), Sabretooth would be a close second. Plus I really enjoy the dynamic he and Logan have.

In summery, The Adversary will be telling Sabretooth’s story after he was banished to the pits of Krakoa for his crimes. What he has been up to might not be what everyone expects.

Loveless by Alice Oseman

I had binge read Alice Oseman’s Heartstopper series back in June. It was a series recommended by a few librarians, so I thought I would check it out. Loveless I caught when it was returned I want to say in July or August. It wasn’t a top priority read when I checked it out, so I ended up buying it (that way people could check it out if they wanted to).

Taking place in the same universe as Heartstopper, Loveless tells the story of Georgia, a young woman who had never been in love. She didn’t even had a crush. But when she goes to university, she believes now is the time she’s ready to change that. However, when things don’t go as planned, she wonders why it’s so easy for other people to fall in love and what exactly Asexuality and Aromatic means. And what does it all mean for her?

I have a feeling this will be a book that I enjoy. Not only because I enjoyed Heartstopper, but because it sounds like a coming of age story from the perspective of someone who might have these questions about themselves.

Conclusion

As you can see, my plans for October are pretty all over the place in terms of genre. This is one of those months that I don’t have a set theme for. What are your reading plans for October? Do you have any new releases you can’t wait to read? Will you be doing a theme or genre you may plan to read in October?

Atlas the Story of Pa Salt, the Final Book of The Seven Sisters Series: My Hopes and Expectations.

When The Missing Sister came out back in 2021, I initially thought this would be the last book in the series. Since each book focused on a sister and the seventh being based on the one that went missing, it would make sense. However, checking Goodreads, like I do, I found out that there will be an eighth book. From my understanding this was in the works prior to her passing and announced not long after The Missing Sister’s release.

According to an interview for The Missing Sister (https://lucindariley.co.uk/seven-sisters-series/the-story-of-the-missing-sister/q-and-a/), Lucinda Riley initially planned for this book to be seven books long. However, she didn’t feel like The Missing Sister could tie up all of the loose ends, feeling that she wouldn’t be able to do it justice. So she started on Atlas: The Story of Pa Salt to finish the series.

And while she did pass away a few months after the release of The Missing Sister, that doesn’t mean it will go unfinished. Since she already had passages and key notes on the story in the works, her eldest son Harry Whittaker, will continue, and finish, the story. According to Goodreads, the book has an expected release of January 2023, however, her website states that it has an expected release in Spring of 2023 (https://lucindariley.co.uk/seven-sisters-series/atlas-the-story-of-pa-salt/).

With that said, I thought I would take a moment to discuss some hopes I have for this book. As well as some things I am expecting. I suppose both are interchangeable, but I do feel some topics might fit more as expectations while others fit more so as thing I hope they include.

Honoring Lucinda Riley’s Memory

With this being not only the last book in the series, but the last book by Lucinda Riley, I feel like this book could be a ceremonial way to say farewell to the author. Whether that be in the form of an “in memory of” section” or some form of tribute to the author in the acknowledgements or notes at the end, I think there should be some form of way that the author is remembered. I’m sure there will be, and that’s not to say that Harry Whittaker shouldn’t get credit for his part, just that this book could be a way to honor Lucinda Riley’s memory.

Exploring Pa Salt’s Character

This is titles Atlas: The Story of Pa Salt, so it’s pretty much a given that it will be about Pa Salt. He had a presence throughout the series, but readers never really got to know the character on a personal level. Only how each sister remembers him.

My hope is that this book will give some closure with Pa Salt as a character. Since his character has been dead since the very beginning, I would hope that this goes over who he was as a person, exploring why he adopted each sister, and the lead up to his passing. Let his story be told in a way that works with the story and wraps it up with the sisters learning more about their father.

The Past and Present Storytelling

This might sound odd, but I would hope that it keeps up the tradition of it being told in the present as well as the past. Not only because the series is known for it, but because I feel that it has to. Again, with Pa Salt being deceased, readers won’t exactly be able to get a first hand account of the character. Rather, the sisters learning more about the man who brought them all together. That would be the present bit.

As for the past portion, it would focus on Pa Salt’s life. Here, readers would get to learn about who he was as a person, where he came from, how he became the man he was, and how he found each sister. And much like the other stories, it should go through a big part of his life. It can start with him as a child or young adult (preferably the latter) and go all the way up to his death.

As far as perspective, I could see this taking a slightly different approach. Normally, each book would be told in the first person for each sister and third for the person from the past. I believe The Missing Sister was the only book that told it from the third person perspective for both. Here, I can see it using solely the third person for both perspectives since it would be his story and D’Aplièse getting answers and learning more about Pa Salt. Alternatively, it could be written from third person for the present part and the first person for Pa Salt’s. That would be a nice change of pace while also utilizing something that the series was known for. There is also the chance that the present could shift a first person perspective for each sister, but I feel like that would be unnecessary and could get confusing.

Ending the Series on a High Note

Since this will be the conclusion to the series, I feel like it should end on something of a high note. That would include wrapping up the loose ends it didn’t get to in The Missing Sister, ending with each sister having learned something, show where each sister ends up, and ending the series on a good conclusive note. While I’m not expecting perfection, I do think that it should resolve what it needs to and feels gratifying. Not rushed. Nor do I think it should end on a happily ever after. It would be nice to see it ending on a happier note, but I’m not looking for a happily ever after necessarily. If one or more of the sisters feel like they have to reevaluate their life or how they viewed Pa Salt, that’s okay. But at the same time, they did get a sort of happily ever after at the end of each of their story, and I don’t think that has to be tossed.

Conclusion

These are just a few things I hope for when Atlas: The Story of Pa Salt is released. If you’ve read the series, what are your expectations for it? Is there anything you hope gets addressed? Are you excited for it?

The Missing Sister: A Review

This is the most recent book in the series as of this review. The seventh book of the Seven Sisters series answers the overarching question that has remained unanswered since the beginning: Who was the seventh sister that Pa Salt never found?

This book answers that question all the while reuniting the six sisters from the previous book. Also know: Minor Spoilers Ahead.

General Disclaimer

My general disclaimer for this book, and the last time you’ll probably see it since I don’t think Atlas, the eighth and final book, will address Pa Salt’s heritage so much as why Pa Salt adopted all of the sisters and his found family through them.

While this series does involve each character finding their birth family, I do not believe that it was the author’s intent to diminish adopted families. Having read the series, I interpreted it as each daughter being given the choice to find their birth families if they so choose. With each daughter choosing to investigate their history.

Synopsis

When Maia, Ally, Star, CeCe, Tiggy, and Electra receive news about the seventh sister that Pa Salt never found, they decide to look into it. They hope to spark a connection, find out what happened, and why this seventh sister wasn’t found. Their investigation brings them to New Zealand, Canada, England, France and Ireland. Along they way they meet Merry and her daughter Mary-Kate, who may hold the secret to the missing sister.

Jumping back into the 1920’s we get to hear the story of Nuala. Nuala is an Irish woman living through Ireland’s war for independence. Her journey details with where she and her family stand, what actions she takes, and what it was like during this turbulent time.

Positives

I’m a sap for Ireland centered stories, being of Irish decent myself and having a curiosity to learn more about Irish history. So one thing I enjoyed was how this book explored Ireland and it’s history. And with this taking place during a time of conflict, getting a sort of look into it from one perspective was neat.

I also liked how we finally got the sisters all back together for this. With this “missing sister” being something that was referenced multiple times throughout the series, it was nice to see that they didn’t leave this plot point on the cutting room floor.

Another thing I thought was a neat reflection of the story was with Merry and her daughter Mary-Kate. Mary Kate finds herself learning more about herself and her family and finds out the truth about her relationship with Merry.

Critiques

The critiques I have are with Merry and how they approached the search for her. Merry was a character that I had mixed feeling on. On the one hand, I understand why she wouldn’t want to meet with the D’Aplièse sisters to a degree. However, her constantly running was something that I found a bit repetitive and annoying at times. Merry does eventually agree to meet up with them, and readers are able to get a conclusion, but O was a little tired of the constant “the D’Aplièse sisters get to the location Merry’s at, but oh no, she fleed the country” cycle.

On the other hand, I can also see how the approach could have been done better. Realistically, it would feel odd if a group of people kept following you wishing to met, even if it wasn’t just the D’Aplièse sisters Merry was trying to evade. So that part makes sense.

On the other, It felt like it just prolonged the inevitable. I’m not opposed to her trying to avoid the D’Aplièse, just that it shouldn’t have lasted as long as it did. I think it would have been nice or at the very least manageable, if after a while of avoiding them, it’s Mary-Kate who decides to act as a mediator and/or talks her mother into speaking to them much sooner. And from there, resolve any issues and explore Merry and Nuala’s stories. But, that’s just my thoughts on it.

Conclusion

I would give this book a seventy eight percent. This rating I believe will log it as my third favorite in the series. I found the premise of finding the “missing sister” to be a good one, and a great way to tie up that loss end. I also thought it was interesting as far as Nuala’s story taking place during Ireland’s war for independence. The only think I wish they had done better was how they approached the D’Aplièse sisters went looking for their missing sister and aspects of Merry’s story.